Tag Archives: Engagement

What I learned from the First US Presidential Debate 2016

by River Ho Rathore

In less than two months, American voters will go to the polls and choose their next Chief Executive. As can be imagined, Twitter feeds and news channels are all abuzz with arguments for and against the primary bets of the country: Hillary Clinton, a tenured politician and former FLOTUS who would be the first woman president if elected, and Donald Trump, a political newbie of dynamite character known for his businesses worth tens of billions.

I was 14,000 kilometers away from where the US Presidential Debate transpired on Tuesday morning (Asia Pacific time). I am not an American, nor am I in politics, but I was glued to CNN, waiting to see how the first of three debates would pan out. This is, after all, one of the most intense presidential campaigns ever run.

For obvious reasons, I listened to the debate intently as the United States is one of – if not THE – most powerful countries in the world and which almost has an iron-clad influence on international organizations. This influence is very important for emerging economies that depend heavily on foreign trade and lending. But more than this, I was intrigued at an individual level. Continue reading

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Situation 24: GETTING TO THE POINT

Betsy presents a new distribution proposal in the team meeting. She kicks off her presentation with providing a highly detailed overview to ensure everybody is on the same page. She notices that nobody listens.

(Click on the pictures to see them in full size) Continue reading

Professionalism and The Golden Rule

by River Ho Rathore

A week back, I had the pleasure of catching up with one of my friends who used to be one of the most demanding bosses I have had the privilege of working with. While giving each other personal updates, our discussion – as it always does – turned into reminiscing about the demanding yet fun environment that we had co-created with our entire employee base.

It was a fun environment, where the Power Distance Index (“PDI”, referencing Geert Hofstede) was very low across the organization, especially in the context of an emerging Asian operation market. In spite of the cordial relationships, everyone was crystal clear about the high performance standards and focused on bringing value to all stakeholders, especially the customers. Continue reading

Situation 23: DISENGAGED

After the career discussion with Mansy, Mian is disengaged, demotivated and underperforming. This affects team performance and makes her the focus of office gossip.

(Click on the pictures to see them in full size) Continue reading

The “Always On” Workplace Culture

Spongebob – Squarepants

Today’s ‘always on’ workplace culture can take a heavy toll on us. Many of us are expected to be on call 24/7 to respond to any query. We are under constant pressure and overloaded with nonstop streams of information. We are simply working more, and harder, rather than smarter.

All of this has a major impact on our well-being. Switching off and resting is a key means of managing stress whatever your profession. However, it’s not always a simple matter of pushing the “off” button.

It is vital that leaders:

  • lead by example,
  • signal what realistic work expectations are,
  • support staff who are showing signs of burn out and
  • create a culture that actively helps people manage their time effectively.

It won’t happen bottom up; too many employees are frightened to set limits for themselves.

Anja Uitdehaag

Malcolm Gladwell, “The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference”

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Reviewed by Femflection

Malcolm Timothy Gladwell, (born September 3, 1963) is an English-born Canadian journalist, bestselling author, and speaker. He has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. He has written five books and all of them were on The New York Times Best Seller list. Gladwell’s books and articles often deal with the unexpected implications of research in the social sciences and make frequent and extended use of academic work, particularly in the areas of sociology, psychology, and social psychology. Gladwell was appointed to the Order of Canada on June 30, 2011. Continue reading