Tag Archives: Behaviour

Michelle Obama Has “It”

by Anja Uitdehaag

John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Gandhi, Oprah Winfrey, Michelle Obama, just to name a few, are all recognized as having “it”.

“It” is that something special that is called “charisma”.

“The word charisma is derived from the Greek word meaning ‘gift or divine favor.’  It is often used to describe an elusive personality trait that includes an uncanny ability to lead, charm, persuade, inspire, and influence people. Charismatic people seem to be able to easily draw the attention and admiration of others.  Related terms and phrases include: grace, exuberance, equanimity, mystique, positive energy, joie de vivre, extreme charm, personal magnetism, personal appeal, electricity, and allure.  Usually many of these specific qualities must be present within a single individual for the person to be considered highly charismatic by the public and their peers.” Continue reading

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Philip Houston, Michael Floyd, Susan Carnicero and Don Tennant, “Spy the Lie: Former CIA Officers Teach You How to Detect Deception”.

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Reviewed by Femflection

How to spot a lie and get people to tell you the truth?

Philip Houston, Michael Floyd, and Susan Carnicero – former CIA officers – are among the world’s best at recognizing deceptive behavior.

In “Spy the Lie” they share their proven techniques for uncovering a lie. They show how a special methodology which was developed to detect deception in the counterterrorism and criminal investigation can be applied in our daily lives.

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Manterrupting

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In the first 26 minutes of the US Presidential Debate alone, Trump interrupted Clinton 25 times; in the total debate more than 50 times. This did not go unnoticed on Twitter.

The phenomenon of women getting unnecessarily interrupted in work meetings is so common it has a name: “manterrupting.”

Studies show when women speak up at work, they are more likely to be interrupted and less likely to be credited for their contributions. As a result, women speak up less than their male counterparts.

We all exhibit unconscious gender bias. Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant phrased it as follows:

“When a woman speaks in a professional setting she walks a tight rope. Either she’s barely heard or she’s judged as too aggressive. When a man says virtually the same thing, heads nod in appreciation for his fine idea.” 

I have two more self-explaining new words for you:

  • Mansplaining: A term to describe when a man patronizingly explains something to a woman, under the supposed assumption that she couldn’t possibly understand because she’s a woman;
  • Bropriating: When a man takes credit for a woman’s idea at a meeting.

Putting a funny or sarcastic name to bad or dominant behavior can be empowering for women, but it is clear there’s still a lot of work to do regarding communication diversity & equality.

Anja Uitdehaag

For more content visit our website http://www.femflection.com

How To Slay As A Single Working Mom

by matheen

We all know how challenging it is to be a working mom with a partner or a husband — but imagine — what more if you’re single and alone? Certainly, solo parenting has its own special and unique set of challenges. Below are a few lists of common issues that single moms share and struggle with: Continue reading

Cait Clarke and Neil Shister, “Dare to Ask! The Woman’s Guidebook to Successful Negotiating”

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Reviewed by Femflection

Cait Clarke is the Director of Public Interest Law Opportunities at Equal Justice Works in Washington, D.C. where she directs the largest legal fellowship program in the United States. She has been a corporate and non-profit negotiation consultant and was the founding director of the National Defender Leadership Institute. She is a graduate of Harvard Law School.

Neil Shister is a journalist who has been a correspondent for Time Magazine, television writer for the Miami Herald, editor of Atlanta Magazine and a marketing executive with Inc. Magazine. He is the author of the best seller 10 Minute Guide to Negotiating. Continue reading

What I learned from the First US Presidential Debate 2016

by River Ho Rathore

In less than two months, American voters will go to the polls and choose their next Chief Executive. As can be imagined, Twitter feeds and news channels are all abuzz with arguments for and against the primary bets of the country: Hillary Clinton, a tenured politician and former FLOTUS who would be the first woman president if elected, and Donald Trump, a political newbie of dynamite character known for his businesses worth tens of billions.

I was 14,000 kilometers away from where the US Presidential Debate transpired on Tuesday morning (Asia Pacific time). I am not an American, nor am I in politics, but I was glued to CNN, waiting to see how the first of three debates would pan out. This is, after all, one of the most intense presidential campaigns ever run.

For obvious reasons, I listened to the debate intently as the United States is one of – if not THE – most powerful countries in the world and which almost has an iron-clad influence on international organizations. This influence is very important for emerging economies that depend heavily on foreign trade and lending. But more than this, I was intrigued at an individual level. Continue reading

Situation 25: HARD WORK VERSUS ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Work is tough. Femsy did not get her latest proposal approved in the MT, and she is making long hours.

(Click on the pictures to see them in full size) Continue reading