Tag Archives: Public Speaking

Lindsay’s In Business: PART 41: Is this TURNAROUND?

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What happens when you realise your path is entrepreneurship rather than employment? Lindsay takes up the challenge and shares an account of her journey as it unfolds…

And then – all at once, an unrelated series of pick-me-ups came in!! Is this it? Is this the start of a turnaround? Continue reading

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The Fine Art of Expressing Yourself

by matheen

Self-expression is essential to our lives as sun, water and air — it’s how we convey ourselves to the world. We express ourselves through communication, our hobbies, our passions, our choices in life, the way we speak, the way we think, the way we live and the way we work. We express ourselves through how we design and furnish our homes, the car we drive, the clothes we wear, the music we listen to, and even the way we style our hair.  Everything is an indication of our feelings, spirits and characters.

However, when it comes to expressing ourselves, expect some roadblocks.  Are you afraid of sharing a piece of yourself to others? Or perhaps you’re shy or an introvert? Do you find that you’re often misunderstood and lack communication skills? Sometimes, life gets in the way and we don’t have the time to express ourselves. Or we simply couldn’t care less. Whatever it is, please don’t let these roadblocks stop you from expressing yourself. There’s a lot of human value in self-expression — it’s a celebration of life itself. It’s an homage to truth, creation, feelings, thoughts and consciousness.  When we share a part of ourselves to others — we are being generous to others. At the same time, self-expression is healthy for us — it promotes well-being, happiness, creativity and freedom! Continue reading

Manterrupting

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In the first 26 minutes of the US Presidential Debate alone, Trump interrupted Clinton 25 times; in the total debate more than 50 times. This did not go unnoticed on Twitter.

The phenomenon of women getting unnecessarily interrupted in work meetings is so common it has a name: “manterrupting.”

Studies show when women speak up at work, they are more likely to be interrupted and less likely to be credited for their contributions. As a result, women speak up less than their male counterparts.

We all exhibit unconscious gender bias. Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant phrased it as follows:

“When a woman speaks in a professional setting she walks a tight rope. Either she’s barely heard or she’s judged as too aggressive. When a man says virtually the same thing, heads nod in appreciation for his fine idea.” 

I have two more self-explaining new words for you:

  • Mansplaining: A term to describe when a man patronizingly explains something to a woman, under the supposed assumption that she couldn’t possibly understand because she’s a woman;
  • Bropriating: When a man takes credit for a woman’s idea at a meeting.

Putting a funny or sarcastic name to bad or dominant behavior can be empowering for women, but it is clear there’s still a lot of work to do regarding communication diversity & equality.

Anja Uitdehaag

For more content visit our website http://www.femflection.com

What I learned from the First US Presidential Debate 2016

by River Ho Rathore

In less than two months, American voters will go to the polls and choose their next Chief Executive. As can be imagined, Twitter feeds and news channels are all abuzz with arguments for and against the primary bets of the country: Hillary Clinton, a tenured politician and former FLOTUS who would be the first woman president if elected, and Donald Trump, a political newbie of dynamite character known for his businesses worth tens of billions.

I was 14,000 kilometers away from where the US Presidential Debate transpired on Tuesday morning (Asia Pacific time). I am not an American, nor am I in politics, but I was glued to CNN, waiting to see how the first of three debates would pan out. This is, after all, one of the most intense presidential campaigns ever run.

For obvious reasons, I listened to the debate intently as the United States is one of – if not THE – most powerful countries in the world and which almost has an iron-clad influence on international organizations. This influence is very important for emerging economies that depend heavily on foreign trade and lending. But more than this, I was intrigued at an individual level. Continue reading